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Singapore’s public transport operator for the rail system, may want to take a leaf out of Japan’s book on how to improve train arrival times. ‘Super Japan: On-time Metro’, gives an inside look on how trains are run in Tokyo. The video by Discovery Channel Asia is available on YouTube. At the start of the video, a driver is seen being timed while driving from one station to the next. The time taken to reach each station is calculated down to seconds.


 
 
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The vast train network that criss-crosses subterranean Tokyo can be a confusing and intimidating place for the uninitiated. Dreary, utilitarian stations drone and chime with a stream of announcements, seemingly ignored by the mass of humanity that spills onto platforms or crams improbably into carriages. It may not be pretty, but in a city where millions of commuters travel by train daily, it boasts the precision of a finely-crafted Swiss watch, keeping Tokyo moving -- even if it means pushing hundreds of people into a single carriage at rush hour.


 
 
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Rikuzentakata, like many towns on Japan’s rugged north-east Pacific coast, was in decline even before last year’s tsunami killed 1 700 of its 24 000 inhabitants and destroyed most of its downtown buildings. With two-thirds of the remaining residents homeless, mayor Futoshi Toba questioned whether the town could recover. Damage to infrastructure and the local economy, he said, would force people to move away to find jobs.


 
 
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Europe and Japan will work together on a strategy to make the Internet safer for children and teenagers. The new strategy was announced by Digital Agenda Commissioner Neelie Kroes on Wednesday. On Thursday, she met with Tatsuo Kawabata, Japanese minister for Internal affairs and Communications to discuss how the European Union and Japan could collaborate on such plans.


 
 
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As Japan continues to rebuild after last year's devastating earthquake and tsunami, one company has developed an ingenious new method to protect homes from the shaking—let them ride it out on a cushion of air. The technology is already being implemented all across Japan – at 88 sites, to be exact (based on company data as of 06/2011). Air Danshin Systems Inc. was originally established in 2005 to market and sell the technology, which was invented by a man named Youichi Sakamoto.


 
 
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When a 9.0 earthquake struck northern Japan in March, Yukihiro Osawa felt prepared. Like most fishermen in his village on Miyagi Prefecture’s Oshika Peninsula, he docked two of his boats on a nearby island where they would be sheltered from the coming tsunami.  He then hurried to shelter, and looked out to sea.


 
 
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TIS&Partners has developed a construction material called CO2 Structure, which hardens quickly and delivers 2.5 times the tensile strength of concrete. "When CO2 is blown into silica, it instantly converts the silica into a material as hard as brick. And a brick can be formed in a little less than a minute. That's what's special about this material. 


 
 
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In the wake of a natural disaster, aid often comes in the form of food, water and medical supplies. Several universities are offering Japan another form of assistance that will help in the effort to rebuild: supercomputing capacity. High-powered computers let researchers create simulations that can reveal important clues as to what may happen next, including where more earthquakes are likely to happen or the potential environmental impact of radiation in the air and water that was released from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant.


 
 
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An IC card security system that tracks kids is now being offered by Tokyu Land Corp. Homeowners who purchase a Tokyu Security home security service plan have the option to enable the Tokyu Kids Security system which sends messages to the parents mobile about where the child is. For this Tokyu has partnered with PASMO Co. which issues rechargeable contactless PASMO IC smartcards for rail and bus systems in Japan.