Bild
Mikihiko Yamato, Deputy Head of Research at Ji Asia tells CNBC's Cash Flow which retailers will benefit from the recent improvement in Japanese consumer sentiment. He expects favourable earnings from fast retailing companies like H&M and Gap. Hit play to find out how Abenomics influence Japanese retailers like Aeon and Izumi.

 
 
Picture
This sound-absorbing blind called Feltone, is available from Tokyo Blinds. Made of felt, it absorbs the sound waves, converting them into thermal energy through repeated reflection. The blinds can reduce an 89dB source by 4dB, resulting in a 60% noise power reduction.


 
 
Picture
Japanese retailer Ryohin Keikaku Co. has published a book detailing the history of its popular Muji consumer product brand to mark its 30th anniversary. The 256-page book, which is available in Japanese, English and Chinese, is filled with photographs of Muji products and retail spaces around the world. It is the "most natural and realistic depiction of Muji," Kenya Hara, a designer and Muji advisory board member, said recently in New York.


 
 
Picture
Tokyo - a city on the edge of Asia, is increasingly an international metropolis. It was here that, in the spring of 1992, the first full - scale complex of interior design showrooms of its kinds in Japan, came into being - the TOKYO DESIGN CENTER. It functions as a meeting place for designers, manufacturers and users to enable people to incorporate design into their own lives as fully as possible. Here they can select the finest in contract and residential furniture, carpets, floor coverings, fabrics, wall coverings, lighting and accessories from Europe, America and Asia.

 
 
Picture
Tommy Kullberg (IKEA) has seen the inside of a few Japanese homes lately and if he has learnt one thing it is that they tend to be, well, rather small. The soft-spoken Swede heading Ikea's return to Japan and his team have visited more than 100 local residences to take notes and try to avoid a repeat of the group's disastrous first foray into the world's number two retail market. Ikea has stores in more than 30 countries but none more challenging than Japan, where even the largest furniture retailer in the world has had to adapt its winning formula with a new store outside Tokyo. It first came to Japan in 1974 with a local partner but failed to win over Japanese consumers and withdrew 12 years later.

"Disneyland is the biggest competitor" Tommy Kullberg (IKEA Japan)